• Roadmap 11

    The Roadmap Conference is the nation’s largest and most advanced annual conference on electric and smart mobility. Roadmap includes nearly 100 national and international speakers, dozens of exhibits, regional smart mobility tour…

  • New ChargePoint EV Charging Station Installed in Victor, NY

    VICTOR, N.Y. (WROC-TV) – A ribbon-cutting ceremony was held in the Village of Victor to celebrate the installation of its first electric vehicle (EV) charging station on Friday. The charging station was installed in the parking lot adjacent to the Village Office Building at 60 East Main Street in Victor with the support of the […]

  • Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Projection (EVI-Pro) Lite Tool

    EVI-Pro Lite is a simplified version of EVI-Pro, which was developed through a collaboration between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the California Energy Commission, with additional support from DOE’s Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO). EVI-Pro uses detailed data on personal vehicle travel patterns, electric vehicle attributes, and charging station characteristics in bottom-up simulations to estimate the quantity and type of charging infrastructure necessary to support regional adoption of electric vehicles.

    The webinar will introduce the new EVI-Pro tool, which allows users to project consumer demand for electric vehicle charging infrastructure.

    Webinar presenters will include:
    • Eric Wood, an NREL vehicle systems engineer, will demonstrate how to use EVI-Pro Lite.
    • Bud Braughton, an engineer with the City of Columbus, will discuss how the city has used the detailed planning study developed by NREL.
    • Rachael Nealer, an analysis program manager within VTO, will discuss how EVI-Pro supports ongoing analysis at DOE.

    Registration is required. To attend, register for the webinar with GoToWebinar.

  • Green Drives Conference & Expo

    The Lake Michigan Consortium – a partnership between Clean Cities coalitions from Chicago, Wisconsin and Northern Indiana – will host the 2018 Green Drives Conference & Expo at Northern Illinois University’s Conference Center in Naperville on Thursday, May 17. Green Drives is one of the largest green-transportation conferences held in the Midwest. The annual conference is a must-attend event for public and private fleets, including commercial and municipal fleet managers, dealerships, fuel suppliers, conversion companies, small businesses, and clean-tech and clean-energy professionals.

  • Secretary of Energy Rick Perry Announces $68.5 Million for Advanced Vehicle Technologies Research

    U.S. Secretary of Energy Rick Perry on May 1 announced up to $68.5 million in available funding for early-stage research of advanced vehicle technologies that will enable more affordable mobility, strengthen domestic energy security, and enhance U.S. economic growth.

    “Transportation is fundamental to the American way of life,” said Secretary Perry. “Investing in early-stage research of advanced transportation technologies can give families and businesses greater choice in how they meet their mobility needs while reducing energy costs and making our transportation more efficient and reliable.”

    Funded through the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, projects selected through this Vehicle Technologies Office funding opportunity will address priorities in advanced batteries and electrification, including cyber security related to electric vehicle charging; materials for both lighter weight vehicle structures and advanced powertrains; technology integration and energy-efficient mobility systems; and engines and fuels, including technologies for off-road applications as well as the co-optimization of engines and fuels.

    Topic areas for this funding opportunity include the following:

    • Topic 1: Batteries and Electrification (up to $27 million)

    • Topic 2: Materials (up to $6 million)

    • Topic 3. Technology Integration (up to $20 million)

    • Topic 4. Engines/Fuels: Off-road Applications (up to $3.5 million)

    • Topic 5. Co-optimization of engines and fuels (up to $12 million)

    Concept papers for this funding opportunity are due May 29, 2018, and full applications will be due July 13, 2018.

    For more information and application requirements, please visit the EERE Exchange website or Grants.gov. Learn more about DOE’s Vehicle Technologies Office.

    For more information, see the full press release.

  • Alternative Fueling Station Locator Overhaul Boasts Improved User Interface

    It’s official—The Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) Station Locator has undergone a major makeover. Constant improvement is at the site’s core, which is why the U.S. Department of Energy’s Vehicle Technology Office is always striving to make the AFDC’s tools easier to use and the data more accessible. The updated Station Locator offers new features and an improved user interface built on the same reliable, comprehensive, and fuel-neutral data that our partners have come to trust.

    Some of the notable new features include a sleek look and feel, simplifying the user experience, as well as a bigger map populated with consistent circle icons for each station location and updated colors representing each fuel type. Users will also notice a larger and more detailed view of specific station information.

    On the Station Locator home page, there are now two tabs at the top of the map: Find Public Stations and Analyze and Download Data.

    The Find Public Stations tab allows users to search for public stations at a specific location, with the option to search for all fuels or just one. The total number of stations that fit the search criteria can be found in the upper right.

    The search defaults to public stations and the following fuel-specific criteria:

    • Level 2 and DC fast charging electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE)
    • Propane stations with vehicle-specific fueling services (i.e., “primary” stations)
    • Hydrogen stations with full public access (i.e., “retail” stations)

    The Map a Route feature, also available on the Find Public Station tab, shows specified fuel types available along a route between two locations. It also displays search results on the right, sorted by distance from the search location.

    The Analyze and Download Data tab allows users to refine their search using filters, broken out into three categories: Location, Fuel, and Station.

    To search by Location, users can enter a state or a specific address and limit results within a certain mile radius. To search by Fuel, users can filter by a single fuel or multiple fuel types, and conduct fuel-specific searches, including the following:

    Compressed Natural Gas (CNG): fill type, vehicle accessibility, and fill pressure
    Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG): vehicle accessibility
    EVSE: charging levels, connector types, and networks
    Ethanol (E85): stations that also offer mid-level ethanol blends
    Propane: stations with limited vehicle-specific fueling capabilities (i.e., “secondary” stations)
    Hydrogen: stations with limited public access (i.e., “nonretail” stations)

    The Station options allow users to filter for public and/or private stations, planned stations, and by owner type and payment methods. All results display on the right, including counts, filters, and options to download the results or see the results on a map.

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) collects and confirms alternative fueling station data through a number of industry sources. To submit a new station for inclusion in the Station Locator, visit the online webform. For multiple station additions or updates, email technicalresponse@icf.com.

    Continue to monitor the U.S. Station Locator for new features, including an alternative fuel corridor planning tool.

  • The Work Truck Show / Green Truck Summit

    Registration is open for both The Work Truck Show, North America’s largest work truck event, and the concurrent Green Truck Summit, the industry’s premier conference on clean energy innovations for commercial vehicles.

    The Green Truck Summit and Work Truck Show will be held March 6–9 at the Indiana Convention Center in Indianapolis, Indiana. Educational sessions, the new Fleet Technical Congress, and the Green Truck Summit begin March 6, and the exhibit hall is open March 7-9.

  • Platooning Trucks to Cut Cost and Improve Efficiency

    Photo Credit: Department of Transportation

    At first glance, platooning doesn’t look like much—just a few tractor-trailers driving down the highway a bit closer together than we’re used to. But, what is actually happening is much more complex and presents the opportunity for significant safety, energy efficiency, and cost benefits. Early studies have shown that 65% of current long-haul truck miles could potentially be platooned, reducing total truck fuel consumption by 4%.

    What is Platooning?

    So, what is truck platooning? Platooning involves the use of vehicle-to-vehicle communications and sensors, such as cameras and radar, to virtually connect two or more trucks together in a convoy. The virtual link enables all of the vehicles in the platoon to communicate with each other, allowing them to automatically accelerate together, brake together, and enables them to follow each other at a closer distance than is typically possible with unlinked trucks.

    The technology detects and reacts to stopped or slow vehicles ahead of the platoon and adjusts as needed when a vehicle cuts in between the trucks in the platoon. With current platooning technology, each truck in the platoon has a human driver responsible for steering and taking over the speed and braking as needed. The driver of the first truck leads the platoon and navigates the route. As the technology improves, there may only be the need for a lead driver, or no human drivers at all.

    Why do it?

    Truck platooning could provide many benefits. When implemented, platooning can improve safety, increase energy efficiency, and reduce costs.

    Truck platooning technology includes automatic braking. The automatic brakes are able to react much faster than a human, improving safety and reducing the likelihood of collisions. Truck platoons also take up less space on the road, and experience fewer short or sudden acceleration and braking events, than unlinked trucks. The trucks travelling closer together at smoother speeds improves traffic flow and boosts the efficiency of delivering goods.

    Platooning is also a cost saver. With the trucks driving close together at a constant speed, the lead vehicle cuts through the air and reduces the amount of air hitting the front of, and flowing between, the following vehicles. This is similar to when race cars or cyclists draft off one another in a race. The reduced aerodynamic drag on all of the vehicles in the platoon means that the trucks use less fuel, which reduces operating costs.

    The U.S. Army is interested in platooning technologies for the potential to reduce the number of lives at risk in combat areas. Using platooning technologies in military applications could minimize the number of soldiers needed to man convoy vehicles, resulting in a reduced number of soldiers at risk of encountering roadside bombs.

    Coordinated Research

    The Department of Energy’s Vehicle Technologies Office’s (VTO) Energy Efficient Mobility Systems (EEMS) Program coordinates with the U.S Army and the Department of Transportation (DOT) in this shared space to accelerate research and development. DOT’s mission is to serve the United States by ensuring a fast, safe, efficient, accessible, and convenient transportation system. DOT sees platooning as one way to improve the safety of trucking through collision avoidance features. VTO is interested in the potential to improve energy efficiency and cut costs for businesses and consumers through this technology.

    VTO’s EEMS Program is investigating the potential impact platooning technology could have on energy use in our transportation system. Recent EEMS research done by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory used telematics, or on-board data logging, to estimate the amount of platoonable miles traveled by trucks and found 65% of the miles could be platooned, resulting in a 4% reduction in total truck fuel consumption. Another recent VTO funded study assessed the energy impact of adaptive cruise control and showed that the middle truck in a platoon saves the most at shorter gaps, while the trailing truck saves the most at longer gaps.

    To learn more about the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) work on connected and automated vehicle technologies, visit the Energy Efficient Mobility Systems page on Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) website.

    This blog was authored by DOE’s VTO and originally appeared as an Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy blog. To stay up to date with VTO, subscribe here: https://energy.gov/eere/vehicles/vehicle-technologies-office-newsletters

  • Nearly Half of All New Cars Sold In 2017 Achieved Fuel Economy Above 30 Miles per Gallon

    In 2017, about 46% of all new cars achieved 30 miles per gallon (mpg) or higher while the number of cars exceeding 50 mpg rose to about 5%. For light trucks, almost two-thirds achieved fuel economy above 20 mpg and less than one percent fell below 15 mpg. By contrast, in 1975, about 88% of new cars achieved less than 20 mpg and about 7% got less than 10 mpg. For new light trucks in 1975, nearly all (97.5%) were under 20 mpg and about 28% were under 10 mpg. Over the 42-year period there have been many advances in engine technologies, transmission technologies, aerodynamics, tires, and high-strength lightweight materials that have increased efficiency of light vehicles.

    *Data for 2017 are preliminary, based on projected production data from the automakers.

    Notes: The definition of cars and light trucks is the same definition as in the Corporate Average Fuel Economy rulemaking. Thus, the car category includes cars, station wagons, and small 2-wheel drive sport utility vehicles (SUV). The light truck category includes pickups, vans, minivans, 4-wheel drive SUV, and large SUV. Fuel economy data are adjusted values that represent EPA’s best estimates of real world performance.

    Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Light-Duty Automotive Technology, Carbon Dioxide Emissions, and Fuel Economy Trends: 1975 Through 2017, EPA-420-R-18-001, January 2018.

    This post originally appeared on Energy.gov.